SHANGHAI PROFIRST CO.,LTD.
 
       

 

 
Organosilicon compounds help improve lithium battery technology

With the help of new silicon-based compounds, scientists -- and patients -- are getting a significant new charge out of the tiny lithium batteries used in implantable devices to help treat nervous system and other disorders.

The lithium battery is the workhorse in implantable devices -- stimulators used to jump start the heart and help the central nervous systemmake critical connections in, for example, Parkinson's and epilepsypatients. Designed to be extraordinarily reliable and work continuously for years, the tiny batteries that power implantables are indispensable in everything from pacemakers to the electronic stimulators that help restore function in the brains of Parkinson's patients.

 

But lithium batteries don't last forever and new surgery to maintain many devices seeded into the body is required, as it is to replace batteries and devices at the end of their lives. Moreover, a new generation of tiny electrical devices to stimulate the nervous system, treat incontinence and overcome muscular impairment is coming on line as scientists and engineers continue to shrink the components that make up the devices.

Central to that ability, according to University of Wisconsin-MadisonProfessor Emeritus of chemistry Robert West, is new lithium battery technology, technology capable of making batteries smaller, last longer and, soon, accept a charge from outside the body without the need for surgery.

 

Using organosilicon compounds, West and his UW-Madison colleagues have developed a new generation of rechargeable lithium ion batteries whose lifetimes are more than twice as long as the batteries now used in the tiny medical devices.

"It turns out the organosilicon compounds are really good for improving lithium battery technology," says West, whose new battery technology powers a "microstimulater" not much larger than a pencil lead and that can be injected near target nerves to help overcome the faulty nervous systemwiring at the heart of Parkinson's, epilepsyand incontinence.

"The idea is that whenever you have a broken nerve connection, you can supply the electrical impulse to complete the circuit," West explains.

 

The microstimulator was developed by a consortium including UW-Madison's Organosilicon Research Center, Argonne National Laboratory, Advanced Bionics Corp., the Alfred Mann Foundation and Quallion, LLC. The device was recognized earlier this year with an "R&D 100 Award" from R&D Magazine.

West's group developed the electrolyte, the electricity-conducting liquid that is the heart of the battery. The new organosilicon compounds developed by the Wisconsin chemists, says West, have numerous advantages over traditional lithium battery chemistry.

Prev: Construction Sealant And Adhesives – Organosilicon Next: New silane coupling agents for truck tire applications.
Profirst Career | R&D | Environmental Protection Idea | Organosilicon Monomers Technology discuss | Organosilicon Intermediates Technology discuss | Latest information of Silane Coupling Agents
Keywords:Organosilicon Products,Manufacturing and Distributing Organosilicon Products,Organosilicon Monomers,Organosilicon Intermediates,Silane Coupling Agents,Organosilicon Forum,
Organosilicon News,Reaction Mechanism of Silane Coupling Agents,Selection Principle of Silane Coupling Agents,Use Instructions for Silane Coupling Agents,Organic Silicon Agricultural Additives
Address: No.2,Lane 1123,Kangqiao Road, Pudong New Area, Shanghai 201315 ,China Tel : 86 21 38122007 Fax : 86 21 38122006 Email: sisale@profirst.biz
  Copyright © Shanghai Profirst Co.,Ltd.